It takes a community: Have you thought about becoming a foster carer?

If you’re thinking about becoming a foster carer to help support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people remain connected to culture, you can find out more at one of our information sessions were holding in Brisbane, Ipswich, Moreton Bay, Fraser Coast, Bundaberg, Townsville and Mackay. You can learn about what’s involved and talk with our staff and people who are foster carers.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are over-represented in out-of-home care in Queensland. For 2017, the Family Matters Campaign reported one in two Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in care are placed away from Indigenous carers.

“Culture is a known strength of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and maintaining young people’s connections to country and culture supports positive outcomes later in life,” Churches of Christ Care’s Children, Youth and Families General Manager Leanne Rutherford said.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children have the right to grow up safe, with family and connected to community and culture.

Our Children, Youth and Family team is holding information sessions for people interested in becoming foster carers and supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people’s connections to family, community and culture.
“Any approach to addressing over-representation should seek to build up Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities to care for their own children and young people,” Ms Rutherford said.

 “Any approach to addressing over-representation should seek to build up Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities to care for their own children and young people,” Ms Rutherford said.

You can have a family or be single, be with or without children. You just need to be able to open your heart and your home to provide a safe environment, and be able to share your culture, or help a young person remain connected to their community.

Types of foster care

We understand that not everyone has the ability to provide full-time care to children and young people so our carers are able to specify what type of care they wish to provide. These include:

  • Respite care – You care for a child or children, usually for one or two weekends a month, in order to give their full-time foster or kinship carer a break.
  • Emergency care – Required when a child requires a placement immediately. Due to the nature of these placements, you may have very little notice before a child is placed with you.
  • Short-term care – You may care for a child for a short period of time ranging from a few weeks up to two years. Children requiring this type of placement are usually working towards being returned home to a parent at the end of the foster care placement.
  • Long-term care – Children requiring this type of placement are in the long-term care of the department and are unlikely to return home to their family.

Can you make a difference?

Yes, you can - it takes a community.

Culture is a known strength of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and maintaining young people’s connections to country and culture supports positive outcomes later in life.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children have the right to grow up safe, with family and connected to community and culture, we are always looking for Indigenous foster carers so we have a greater capacity to place Indigenous children with Indigenous families.

Our Children, Youth and Families service has over 1,000 foster carers right across Queensland. We are proud of the work they do to provide safe and nurturing homes for children and young people – everyone plays a valuable and important role.

Our carers offer tremendous value to the community by providing safe family environments and homes, and helping children heal and grow.

Find an information session near you at www.fosterwithus.com.au
Posted August 30, 2018 in Our blog